Sugar Overload

Sugar overload?  Think about it. Halloween is here, and Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day are around the corner.  Then comes Valentines Day, and the birthdays, anniversaries, etc., etc., etc.  

What do all these holidays and celebrations have in common?  FOOD!!

Food is nearly always at the center of our celebrations.

But, let's talk about our sugar consumption. It's in nearly every food we eat, at celebrations and at every meal! We're talking sugar overload - on a regular basis!

Natural sugar, the type found in fruit, is healthy.  But added sugar is a different story.  And, while we're eating and drinking way too much of the white stuff, the evidence points to added sugar as a major contributor in today's critical health crises: obesity and diabetes!  Other chronic conditions are blamed, at least partially, on sugar consumption, as well.    

We know there's sugar in just about every food we eat and drink.  We also know that people are eating too much of it -  about 22 tsp. per day on average.  The recommended daily amount, according to the American Cancer Society, is 6 tsp. for women and 9 tsp. for men.  It all adds up to a lot of extra calories!

So, in addition to consuming extra calories and putting on the pounds, exactly what is happening to our bodies because of this abundance of sugar consumption?  Other than weight gain, does all this added sugar really have a negative effect on us?

As the holidays approach, it's worth investigating so that we can  make healthy choices and be better informed. We'll be equipped with the knowledge that will help guide us in the way we feed our families: the foods we buy, and the meals we order.   

Let's study the physical effects of sugar overload on the human body. 

Soft drinks are the #1 source of calories in the American diet!



What Does
 Sugar Overload
have to do with
Fatty Liver Disease?

Watch this short video for Dr. Hyman's clear explanation.

<iframe width="460" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yvfGuErYUyg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


Fatty liver disease (also known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) affects 1/3 of adults, an increasing number of children, and is strongly associated with obesity and insulin resistance.

According to Dr. Hyman (and a lot of other health experts), FAT doesn’t cause fatty liver.  SUGAR causes fatty liver!

Fatty liver can result in:

  • insulin resistance
  • belly fat
  • high triglycerides, low HDLs (the good cholesterol) and high LDLs (the bad cholesterol)
  • an increased risk of heart attack and heart disease. 
  • an increased risk of developing chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and cancer.

For more information, visit my webpage about the liver and what harms it. 

*     *     *

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is the #1 cause of Fatty Liver Disease!

How can you protect yourself and your family from the effects of fatty liver disease; aka, too much sugar and processed foods?

  • Cut out all high fructose corn syrup! 
  • Reduce starches; white flour, white rice, and white bread.
  • Exercise and improve your metabolism
  • Eat more superfoods:  kale, spinach, collards, brussel sprouts, garlic, and onions.
  • Also, add in nuts and seeds, lean protein, fruits and vegetables, and fish  

High fructose corn syrup is the #1 cause of fatty liver disease!

Evidence

The pathogenesis of fatty liver disease is still poorly understood.  But, one of my nursing texts describes it pretty well:

According to Pathophysiology; The biologic basis for disease in Adults and Children (6th edition), lipid accumulation in liver cells causes an organic condition known as fatty liverAs lipids fill the cells, vacuolation pushes the nucleus and other organelles aside.  The liver appears yellowish and greasy. This process sets other physiologic mechanisms in motion.

The disease begins when excess sugar consumption results in abnormal triglyceride accumulation in the liver.  This can progress to an inflammatory response which can then result in cirrhosis or cancer. 

Since sugar acts on the liver in the same manner as alcohol, cellular damage occurs, promoting fat accumulation and impairing the liver’s ability to function.  

For more information on fatty liver disease, visit WebMD.


The Solution to Permanent Weight Loss

(the inspiration for this website)

by Robin D. George


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